The War of Art by Steven Pressfield book summary

The War of Art by Steven Pressfield [Summary]

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The Book In Three Or More Sentences:

The author is explaining in great detail how this force, the Resistance, is playing with our minds. Basically, Steven Pressfield is giving us ways and how-to guides that will help us overcome our procrastination problem. A way to fight this insidious beast pushing us towards mediocrity. A way to win our inner battles.

The Core Idea:

There is this force that we can’t see, touch, smell or hear but we can feel. It’s a force, so strong, that can destroy lives. It’s called the Resistance. The invisible force that will try to manipulate you and send you to the bench every time you think about training, working out, bench pressing. It will feed your mind with what you want to hear in order to keep you intact and away from doing what you should be doing. In The War of Art, Steven Pressfield will help us beat the hell out of this invisible force.

5 Key Lessons from The War of Art:

Lessons #1: What is The Resistance?

Resistance by definition is self-sabotaging. An enemy to anyone aiming to escape his average life and become more, something better, start a business, or finally do the job he was hired for.

This force aims to sabotage your every act of self-discipline. It will prompt you to stop what you’re doing and lure you into the depths of endless pleasure. Fortunately for the Resistance, pleasure is all around us nowadays: discounts, commercials, videos, social media, online dating, etc.

The Resistance is this voice that will tell you to abandon what you’re doing. Convince you that what you’re doing doesn’t make any sense and put the phone in your hand so you can procrastinate.

Every time you choose social media instead of working on your project, the Resistance wins. In contrast, every time you choose to work undistracted on a task by your choice you kick the Resistance’s ass.

To conquer this invisible force that is pushing you towards mediocrity you need to stay vigilant. Concentrated in your ultimate goal in life.

Lessons #2: Self-Dramatization and Victimhood

Turning our daily lives into a TV-worthy soap opera is a symptom of the Resistance. A lot of people do stupid stuff only to get someone’s attention.

You might steal a car, bring home a man/women with head-to-toe tattoos, even coloring your hair pink (or another strange color) is a way to get attention from the people around. But probably the most common, and well disguised, way to make people care about you is to act like you’re sick.

People love self-dramatization and playing the victim. They can present a story in such a way so that everyone around them will start to nurture them, calm them, sometimes this can even spark deeper feelings, like love.

Doctors estimate that seventy to eighty percent of their business is non-health-related. People are just self-dramatizing, they are not sick. There is a name actually about this “feeling”, it’s called the Munchausen syndrome. It’s a mental disorder in which the patient fakes illness to gain attention and sympathy.

If you suffer from something like this, or you know people who have it, it means that the Resistance is all over them.

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